Blogging Comments

I want to take the time to thank everyone who has posted comments lately.  Your comments are sometimes the very best part of part of this blog, and I especially love it when you all start sharing those memories.  I don’t intentionally post things that I think will bring out memories, and so I’m always pleased when it happens.

A while back I had an email conversation with Susan, who comments here as Fashion Witness.  It was about the importance of preserving our fashion memories.  As important as these digital conversations are, I do hope that you are also sharing your memories with the younger generation.  When I was teaching I would often tell the kids about life in the 1960s and 70s, and of course that included how we dressed.  One of the best questions I was ever asked by an eleven-year-old was, “Mrs. Bramlett, were the Sixties really groovy?”

I was recently sent a digital review copy of an upcoming book that was written by a very popular fashion blogger.   I’ll not be reviewing the book because reading about how a girl lost her virginity to an ex-boyfriend, and her many mishaps with dealing with her period are not my cup of tea.  But I did check out her blog, and was struck at how different most of her reader comments were from the ones here at The Vintage Traveler.  There was a lot of “OMG you are so cute,” and “I love your purse.  Please check out my blog.”  I’m so grateful to have readers who take the time to leave thought-provoking comments.  Seriously, it makes you less of a reader, and more of a friend.

 

 

38 Comments

Filed under Summer Sports, Viewpoint, Vintage Photographs

38 responses to “Blogging Comments

  1. FWIW, the pleasre is all mine.

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  2. Fashion Witness

    Thanks — and can you tell us more about that ‘flame-patterned’ two piece? It really caught me by surprise!

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    • I’m glad you asked! I got this photo just because of the 2 piece suit. The one piece suit is 1930s, and that does seem to be the era of the photo. It is pretty early for a 2 piece, and that one, especially the top, is pretty skimpy. And isn’t that a belly-button?

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  3. OMG, I think that you are cute!
    I appreciate your blog very much. It’s nice to have something interesting to read, and we like some of the same things. I’ve grown tired of seeing blogs filled with girls just posing, with nothing to say.

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  4. I have said it before and I’ll say it again – I have learned so much from reading your blog – and enjoy it so much! I definitely think of you as a friend!

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  5. I always look forward to reading your posts Lizzie. You always manage to write something interesting and/or thought provoking (or both!!!) A constant inspiration to me . . . . . . and OMG! you are soooooooooooo cute too!! ;-)

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  6. Hello all….I know what OMG means (I assume it means “Oh my Goodness”)….but what is FWIW??? (reply S. Geiger) You know, I am the almost 82 year old “senior chick” lady who makes the vintage mannequins and pretty cool…but not cool enough to know about texting language. SO HELP!

    I will take this moment to compliment you Lizzie…on your blog subjects…I am just amazed at your vast knowledge…I have learned much since I joined your blog. Thanks.

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  7. You all are too nice. This blog (and your participation) is what keeps me learning, so of course I have to share.

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  8. I wanted to echo everyone’s comments above. I love finding out about the things you post, and the wealth of knowledge always shared in the comments. It’s so much more rewarding than scrolling through endless “too cutes!” and similar.

    I’m also curious to know how you answered the question about the Sixties being groovy for the 11 year-old. I remember asking my mother something very similar, and being impressed by her answer (she was also a teacher)!

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    • Frances, my first thought was to tell him that even though I was there, I couldn’t really remember. But I quickly realized that would go over their little heads, so I turned the question around on him and said that I was a child of the 60s, and am I not the grooviest teacher he knows. His answer was, of course, yes. So, I said, there’s your answer.

      I’m curious. How did your mother answer the question?

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      • Ha, wonderful – very clever of you!

        Well, my question came about because we’d found an old magazine spread from the 1960s that had been used to line a drawer, and was suitably groovy. I asked my mum if that was the kind of thing she and everyone wore in the 60s.

        She made me go and get one of her contemporary fashion magazines, flicked to an editorial and asked if we were wearing what they were wearing in the magazine. And although I probably had on a typically 80s kids frock, I realised it was nowhere near as extreme as the fashions pictured in the magazine. I think that was a pretty smart response of her too!

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  9. To me, the purpose of blogging is to share or impart something of importance, something interesting or unique. Otherwise, what’s the point, really? I would love to be a prolific blogger, but alas, I don’t have that many original things to say, so my blog languishes with my thoughts of putting it out of its misery. Lizzie, you give us things, and I learn so much from your blog. It’s worthwhile and I come away with something I didn’t know. I’ve discovered designers, shopping destinations, and myriad other things that you’ve shared. Another wonderful thing is the fact that we’re close in age and have some of the same experiences. I think that is what makes you feel more like a friend than some fashion blogger with a cute purse! I look forward to what you have to say and what you have to share. Don’t stop!

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    • I appreciate your remarks so much! I’m happy to spread around the things I find that I know others like me will enjoy.

      I do like fashion bloggers, especially those that not only show off their pretty frocks and shoes and purses, but who do have a point of view about vintage and fashion. I like writers to share opinions and their lives. Seeing 20 pretty photos of the same outfit (often with no commentary) does nothing for me!

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  10. Seeing as I am only 24, I am always very happy when someone from an older generation wants to share their (fashion) knowledge. I always read your posts with great interest. So thank YOU Lizzie!

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  11. Gail Ann Thompson

    I went to my husband’s 45th class reunion last night. The class president, now a HS principal gave a very short speech. He spoke eloquently about the differences in dress code between 1968 and the present. The 1968 Student HandBook said, “No casual wear or clothes suitable for sporting events, may be worn in the halls or classrooms, at any time.” He lamented that today’s girls dressed so scantily that it was a distraction to everyone. His main complaint was that if any male teacher made a negative comment or tried to discourage such clothing he was immediately suspect of sexual harassment.

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    • You know, there is a lot of middle ground between 1960s dress codes and the skimpiness of kids’s (both male and female) clothing today. It’s a shame that there is not more support for rational clothing choices for teens.

      I’m all for freedom of expression in one’s clothing, but in a school setting, it is not always practical. It does not take a lot to completely disrupt a class of 11 year olds. I’ve lost valuable teaching time to things like bright green hair or a Hooters tee shirt!

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  12. I really laughed at your student’s asking if the 60s were groovy – and yes, they were very groovy. Ha!

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  13. It’s great to know that I can find something new nearly every day here on your blog, and the topics with your unique perspective are always fun too. To make this all happen, I realize that you must be putting tons of time in on a daily basis, which makes you some kind of a wonder woman in my book!

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  14. I love how your blog teaches me about history and fashion! My mother just groans at her old clothes in photos but doesn’t have anything to share because she either doesn’t remember or just wasn’t into knowing about fashion even when she participated in the trends of her time.

    And not only do I love learning so much from you, the comment section of your blog is sometimes just as fascinating and amazing! You truly have a talent for getting people to share interesting stories! I find myself reading and following the comments more on this blog than any other.

    So many blogs don’t inspire discussion and I find myself cringing a little when I leave a long comment on those “you are so cute!” blogs, but I just remember that I love the long comments on yours (and on mine!) and leave them anyway.

    And btw, you ARE cute. =)

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  15. Ditto ditto ditto ditto ditto. That was not very eloquent but more of that has been written already. I am constantly amazed to see the “stats” as to from where my audience is reading. Latvia? Indonesia? I hope someday the thoughts* we record will serve as an insight to our lives much as the diaries of women in history. * But not OMG your purse is cute!

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  16. To all the people visiting from agotchat: I’m so happy you found something wonderful to spend your time on this afternoon.

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  17. Your mention of your student’s question about the 60s reminded me of a quote by the author Julian Barnes (which he incorporated into his novel “A Sense of an Ending”): “The sixties didn’t happen until the seventies for most people–including me.”
    Lizzie, your blog is one of a very few that I make every effort to read faithfully. You always have some interesting historical tidbit or keen observation. I don’t get to antique malls anymore so always like your shopping expeditions posts too. On my blog, I am guilty of the “this is what I wore today” post, but do try to work in some fashion history here and there. It’s also a bit of a personal scrapbook where I make connections that are probably only interesting to me :) But, I’m not one for the mutual love-fest of many fashion blogs, which consists of ooh-ing and aah-ing over each other’s style choices.
    I can tell from someone’s blogs if they are someone with whom I would be friends with in real life. With the bloggers who I’ve met, we talked non-stop as we share so many interests.

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    • Oh, don’t say “guilty of.” I love when vintage collectors show off their outfits when mixed with other content. And there are a few (mainly older) fashion bloggers that I love to look at just because their style is interesting. But I rarely comment on them because there are only so many ways to say “Great outfit.”

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  18. jlapidow

    That is a gorgeous photo!

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  19. I love reading your blog, very glad I found it. Comments are definitely the best part of blogging, it really feels like a community. Xxx

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