Category Archives: Ad Campaign

Ad Campaign – Bobbie Brooks, 1957

Luscious lambswool intarsia sweaters by Bobbie Brooks and a dyed-to-match skirt

A magnificent look… yours in either beige heather or grey heather.

What I found interesting about this ad from 1957 was the use of the word “intarsia.”  I strongly suspect that if I were to stand on the corner of a busy street and ask random strangers what an intarsia sweater is that very few of them would know, the exceptions being knitters and textile fanatics.  But there it was in 1957 being used as a selling point in an ad as if anyone reading it would know the term.

I was too young in 1957 to have any idea about this, but what about my older readers?  Did intarsia sweaters mean anything to you?

For the non-knitters reading, intarsia is a technique of using different blocks of color like you see in all three sweaters above. For each block the other color is not carried across the back of the knitting like is commonly seen in patterned sweaters.

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Veteran’s Day, 1919

Repost from 11/11/11

This ad is from 1919, a year in which Americans were seeing the return of many injured servicemen from WWI.  America had a bit of a romanticized view of the war, being so far removed from the horrors that Europe was experiencing, and even after the war ended, and many men came home with their rose-colored glasses removed, the public was pretty much unaware of the horrendous experience of it all.

This ad came form a 1919 Harper’s Bazar.  Many of the stories in the magazine, and in others from 1919, refer to returning soldiers,  and to the war, but there really is no mention of just how bad an experience it had been.  In the stories, there seems to be no “shell shock,”  no poison gas, no death.

I guess it would have been worth it had one of the names for WWI been true – “The War to End All Wars.”  But unfortunately, they were wrong in 1919.

 

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Ad Campaign – Dalton Cashmere, 1956

The Dalton Twins Dash from Desk to Date.

Wendy is Dalton’s captivating sweater of 100% pure imported cashmere… color matched with its own slim svelte skirt of Stroock’s pure cashmere or cashmere blends.

Dalton was founded in 1949 by Arthur Dery and Maurice Saltzman (who was also the owner of Bobbie Brooks), and was  headquartered in Cleveland and  Willoughby, Ohio.  Dalton was best known for their cashmere sweaters, but they also made woolen skirts that were dyed to match the sweaters.  I found the reference to Stroock interesting, as that company’s label is usually found in cashmere and fine wool coats.  For much of the twentieth century Sylvan Stroock’s company was the leading US maker of luxury wools.

And when was the last time you saw the words “captivating” or “svelte” in an advertisement?

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Ad Campaign – James Kenrob, 1962

Here’s that girl again… in “Americana” Double Knit-mates

Best of the new – sleek wool double knits to mate in seventeen plus ways.  Newest of the new – boldly printed fut blend cardigans that top everything.  The whole kitten’ kaboodle from our “Americana” collection priced to please college and career budgets.

As the ad says, James Kenrob was a division of Dalton.  Dalton was one of the major cashmere makers in the US, and they made wool skirts to coordinate with their high quality sweaters.  In 1959 Dalton registered the James Kenrob trademark.  Under that label the company produced double knits in both wool and synthetic fibers.

I really, really do love this sweater.  I have a thing for argyle and harlequin prints, and I think the color combination of green and blue looks so fresh.  And how about that coordinating cushion and headband, not to mention her hair and the apple!

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Ad Campaign – Jantzen Kharafleece, 1951

That wonderful top-to-toe look…

it’s Kharafleece

sweaters

skirts

and match-mate

sox

all together now-

heavenly sweaters and skirts

in Jantzen-exclusive

Kharafleece: purest virgin

worsted wool, nylon and

miracle vicara… cashmere soft…

washable… practically

wrinkleproof.  And stunning sox for an echo!

The question in my mind was what the heck is vicara?  I had seen the fiber listed on sweaters from the 1950s, but I’d never really given it a lot of thought.  As it turns out, vicara is a protein fiber that is extracted from corn.  Those twentieth century chemists were nothing if not creative.

As were the ad copy writers.  See how they tied together vicara and cashmere?  It’s enough to make you think there was a vicara goat.

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Ad Campaign – Baker Shoes for Women, 1918

STYLES THAT MAKE STYLE

FOR MANY SEASONS, Baker Styles have played a dominant part in establishing footwear fashion.  Invariably becoming and in perfect taste, they are notable also for an initiative in style that wins the approval of women who dress smartly.

This ad may be for shoes, but all I can see is that fantastic cape.  I’ve never really been a lover of capes, but then I’ve never seen one with such a luxurious looking lining before.  In my imagination, that fabric is an incredibly soft printed cashmere.  Yes, I know it reads as silk, but I want cashmere.

One thing I learned from making that Chanel-ish jacket is that a top quality lining is so important in the way it makes the wearer feel.  One way that clothing manufacturers scrimp is on cheap fabrics for linings.  After having an exceptional silk lining, I’m sure I never want something called acetate next to my skin ever again.

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Ad Campaign – Camel Cigarettes, 1930

En Route

Unnumbered miles slip away from the Limited…sagebrush and sand and a painted desert…mountains stark above timberline. But through all the changing scene, this cigarette will be your best companion.  Fragrant, refreshing, dependable, it adds the flavor of enjoyment to your journey…And whether you travel three days or three hours, you know that you’re going some place, when you go with Camels.

Because of the reference to sagebrush and sand, I assume this ad is talking about the Sunset Limited, which runs between New Orleans and Los Angeles. About twenty years ago we got the idea to take a long train trip, and we settled on the Sunset, traveling from New Orleans to Tuscon, Arizona.  Most of the trip was through Texas, and I can tell you that is one big state with lots of sagebrush and sand.  It would take more than cigarettes to make all those miles slip away.

The ad makes train travel look so chic.  In 1995, the dress of most travelers was very casual, though I expect that today many are shuffling around in slippers and pajama pants.  And of course, the train is now smoke free.  At least some things are an improvement!

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