Category Archives: Ad Campaign

Ad Campaign – Dalton Cashmere, 1956

The Dalton Twins Dash from Desk to Date.

Wendy is Dalton’s captivating sweater of 100% pure imported cashmere… color matched with its own slim svelte skirt of Stroock’s pure cashmere or cashmere blends.

Dalton was founded in 1949 by Arthur Dery and Maurice Saltzman (who was also the owner of Bobbie Brooks), and was  headquartered in Cleveland and  Willoughby, Ohio.  Dalton was best known for their cashmere sweaters, but they also made woolen skirts that were dyed to match the sweaters.  I found the reference to Stroock interesting, as that company’s label is usually found in cashmere and fine wool coats.  For much of the twentieth century Sylvan Stroock’s company was the leading US maker of luxury wools.

And when was the last time you saw the words “captivating” or “svelte” in an advertisement?

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Ad Campaign – James Kenrob, 1962

Here’s that girl again… in “Americana” Double Knit-mates

Best of the new – sleek wool double knits to mate in seventeen plus ways.  Newest of the new – boldly printed fut blend cardigans that top everything.  The whole kitten’ kaboodle from our “Americana” collection priced to please college and career budgets.

As the ad says, James Kenrob was a division of Dalton.  Dalton was one of the major cashmere makers in the US, and they made wool skirts to coordinate with their high quality sweaters.  In 1959 Dalton registered the James Kenrob trademark.  Under that label the company produced double knits in both wool and synthetic fibers.

I really, really do love this sweater.  I have a thing for argyle and harlequin prints, and I think the color combination of green and blue looks so fresh.  And how about that coordinating cushion and headband, not to mention her hair and the apple!

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Ad Campaign – Jantzen Kharafleece, 1951

That wonderful top-to-toe look…

it’s Kharafleece

sweaters

skirts

and match-mate

sox

all together now-

heavenly sweaters and skirts

in Jantzen-exclusive

Kharafleece: purest virgin

worsted wool, nylon and

miracle vicara… cashmere soft…

washable… practically

wrinkleproof.  And stunning sox for an echo!

The question in my mind was what the heck is vicara?  I had seen the fiber listed on sweaters from the 1950s, but I’d never really given it a lot of thought.  As it turns out, vicara is a protein fiber that is extracted from corn.  Those twentieth century chemists were nothing if not creative.

As were the ad copy writers.  See how they tied together vicara and cashmere?  It’s enough to make you think there was a vicara goat.

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Ad Campaign – Baker Shoes for Women, 1918

STYLES THAT MAKE STYLE

FOR MANY SEASONS, Baker Styles have played a dominant part in establishing footwear fashion.  Invariably becoming and in perfect taste, they are notable also for an initiative in style that wins the approval of women who dress smartly.

This ad may be for shoes, but all I can see is that fantastic cape.  I’ve never really been a lover of capes, but then I’ve never seen one with such a luxurious looking lining before.  In my imagination, that fabric is an incredibly soft printed cashmere.  Yes, I know it reads as silk, but I want cashmere.

One thing I learned from making that Chanel-ish jacket is that a top quality lining is so important in the way it makes the wearer feel.  One way that clothing manufacturers scrimp is on cheap fabrics for linings.  After having an exceptional silk lining, I’m sure I never want something called acetate next to my skin ever again.

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Ad Campaign – Camel Cigarettes, 1930

En Route

Unnumbered miles slip away from the Limited…sagebrush and sand and a painted desert…mountains stark above timberline. But through all the changing scene, this cigarette will be your best companion.  Fragrant, refreshing, dependable, it adds the flavor of enjoyment to your journey…And whether you travel three days or three hours, you know that you’re going some place, when you go with Camels.

Because of the reference to sagebrush and sand, I assume this ad is talking about the Sunset Limited, which runs between New Orleans and Los Angeles. About twenty years ago we got the idea to take a long train trip, and we settled on the Sunset, traveling from New Orleans to Tuscon, Arizona.  Most of the trip was through Texas, and I can tell you that is one big state with lots of sagebrush and sand.  It would take more than cigarettes to make all those miles slip away.

The ad makes train travel look so chic.  In 1995, the dress of most travelers was very casual, though I expect that today many are shuffling around in slippers and pajama pants.  And of course, the train is now smoke free.  At least some things are an improvement!

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Ad Campaign – Dorset Fabrics, 1947

The sun shines on Mr. and Mrs… who have carbon-copy tastes about vacations, about fabrics to live in.  They like the utterly young firm feel of Whaler, that good gabardine from Dorset…they like the way this playmate to all America holds its shape through sports and travel. Whaler is a whale of a fabric for rainwear too.  It’s but one of the new Dorset fashion fabrics going places in men’s wear, women’s wear and sportswear.

I think this is a rather clever way to show off the colors available in this new fabric, with Mr. and Mrs. looking on and ready to enjoy a vacation by the pool.  You can’t tell it so much from my photograph, but the ad photography is crisp enough that you can see the twill and texture of the fabrics.  There is even a gabardine sun.

From the always fantastic American Fabrics, issue 4, 1947.

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Ad Campaign – Cohama Fabrics, 1947

Today’s post is a rerun from over two years ago.  I recently ran across this and decided to share it with all who missed it the first time around.

I suppose I ought to have a category titled, “Things I didn’t know,”  because that is where this entry would have to be placed.  Or it could go under “Things I learned while looking for something else,”  or even, “Things I should have noticed before but did not.”

While looking through my collection of American Fabrics magazines, the above ad caught my eye. It tells how fabric maker Cohama maintained the Cohama Hand-Looming Workshop,  a place where the fabric designers could experiment with their ideas before committing to large runs on the mechanized looms. I thought that this was a pretty neat idea, and gave Cohama some silent brownie points for such a practical solution to what can be a costly problem.

But it turns out that Cohana was not the only wool manufacturer who relied on the hand loom to try out the new ideas of the designers.

In the Fall 1949 issue of American Fabrics there is a small article, “Ideas Tailored on a Moment’s Notice”, in which they show the hand weaving operation at Forstmann Woolen Company.  Called the Provincial Designing Room, it was under the direction of Miss Margaret Swanson, and employed two hand looms on which weavers would interpret the ideas of designers working for clothing manufacturers. The designer could watch the fabric develop, and make changes if necessary. After the designer was satisfied with the sample, it would be processed by the mechanized looms.

I love the quaintness of the Provincial Designing Room!  In the photo above Miss Swanson is working with Ellen Brooke of Glenhunt (a suit and coat maker) and a hand weaver to develop the fabric to Miss Brooke’s satisfaction.

Brooke and Swanson, looking at how the newly developed fabric cuts and drapes.

The hand weaver, Alice Berman, making the sample worked out by Swanson and Brooke.

A swatch of the handwoven sample

And where the run of fabric will eventually be made, on the fully automated looms at Forestmann.

All illustrations are from the Fall 1949 issue of American  Fabrics and are copyright Reporter Publications, Inc.

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