Wardrobe Magic from Bobbie Brooks, 1964

I recently got this great little promotional book from Bobbie Brooks.  You younger readers probably know Bobbie Brooks only as a Walmart brand, or maybe as just one of the many cheap lines that thrift stores are so full of.  But during the 1960s, Bobbie Brooks was big stuff.

The company was formed in 1957, and the owners took a scientific appproach to merchandising. They came up with an organized plan of choosing which garments to manufacture. This plan utilized a consumer board made up of 600 of  junior-sized teens and young women, their targeted consumers.  So in effect, the clothes were those chosen by the potential wearers.  By the time this booklet was published by the company in 1964, Bobbie Brooks was one of the largest clothing makers in the US.

So I suppose they felt qualified to give out wardrobe advice.  Actually, the advice in this booklet is quite good. There’s nothing earth shattering in it, but how can you argue with “Fit is everything” or “Look for the signs of quality.”

Most of all I love the diagrams I’ve included here that explain some clothing terms.  I do love an Italian roll collar, but honestly the Peter Pan and the Bermuda were more in the Bobbie Brooks style.  And I guess that’s why the company went into decline by the end of the 1960s.  These were good girl clothes, and we all know what way she went.

The company was eventually bought by Garan, who signed a deal with Walmart to sell Bobbie Brooks.  No longer was it a mid-priced junior line.  And most recently, the label was spotted at the Dollar General Store.  Looks like the end of the line for another great American brand.

Trivia:  What 1982 rock song references Bobbie Brooks?

Comments:

Posted by KeLLy Ann:

“dribble off those bobbie brooks let me do what i please….” ahhahahaa! That brings me back. Its a shame that people seem to just settle for the crap they call clothes today. sigh.

Wednesday, February 3rd 2010 @ 7:01 PM

Posted by Sherie:

“Little ditty about Jack and Diane…” It’s a crime what has happened to some of these great old brands.

Thursday, February 4th 2010 @ 4:44 PM

Posted by Lizzie:

Yep! That’s the song. I’ve always loved that line.

And yes, it is a real shame to think of what has happened to our clothing industry.

Friday, February 5th 2010 @ 8:35 AM

Posted by Becca:

“Life Goes On” which I knew before I read the comments! But–1982? Really! I love the pointers in here too–helps me describe the clothes I list. Thanks for your wonderful blog!:)

Friday, February 5th 2010 @ 7:04 PM

Posted by tom tuttle from tacoma:

i know “life goes on” but really nothing about bobbie brooks… love these but do you have them larger?

Friday, February 5th 2010 @ 8:53 PM

Posted by Mod Betty / Retro Roadmap:

I love your corrolation between the demise of “good girl clothes” and the late 60’s- totally makes sense! Sad in a way though too. Thanks for sharing this!

Saturday, February 6th 2010 @ 2:53 PM

Posted by Lizzie:

ttft, I have some of them on flickr and will try to get the rest of them added tomorrrow.

Yes, Mod-B, not many of us were going for the Bobbie Brooks look in the early 70s!

Saturday, February 6th 2010 @ 4:18 PM

 

12 Comments

Filed under Advertisements, Vintage Clothing

12 responses to “Wardrobe Magic from Bobbie Brooks, 1964

  1. Cheryl Cleveland

    I found one of these exact same pamphlets in my stuff from childhood, in great condition would any body be interested in it? i hate to throw it away

    Like

  2. So Bobbie Brooks manufactured a line called “Moody’s Goose” I have a couple of vintage 70’s jeans that have a WPL 8231 showing Bobbie Brooks as the maker , one pair came from Boston Store, closed in 1979, the other pair has a price tag with Moody’s Goose printed on the tag,along with a sale price of 16.95

    Like

    • That is really interesting. I remember Moody’s Goose, but had no idea that it was a Bobbie Brooks line. Starting in the 1960s many older manufacturers came up with different labels that they thought would appeal to a hipper customer.

      Like

  3. Pingback: Ad Campaign – Bobbie Brooks, 1960 | The Vintage Traveler

  4. sally rhodesI

    I have a Bobbie brooks sweater that will be 50 years old in DECEMBER it was my first Christmas present from my husband.

    Like

  5. These Bobbie brooks tops fit me to a tee and make me look taller and thinner and I love the quality.

    Like

  6. connie

    It was about 1964, I was about 10 when I got my Bobbie Brooks, a beautiful heather rose cardigan sweater with with gros grain ribbon and matching pleated, plaid skirt. I really thought I was something! Fifty years later I can still picture them clear as day!

    Like

  7. Evelyn simmons

    I grew up In a small town in louisiana. i loved the bobby brooks clothes sold at a store on our town next to my father’s dimestore an was there every Saturday to look at what was New.
    Evelyn Kottle Simmons

    Like

  8. Cherish Fortier

    my mother who is long past models some catalog modeling for Bobby Brooks in the 1960s is there anyway I can might be able to find any of these catalogs or are in the archives? There is a way check or access these please let me know I would love to see them.

    Like

    • You could look for them on ebay, but things like catalogs from a specific company come up rarely for sale. I don’t know if there is an archive of Bobbie Brooks. Perhaps some design school has it, but that’s pretty unlikely.

      Like

  9. Cindy Purnell

    Oh sweet memories! I loved each piece of Bobby Brooks clothing I owned back in the mid 60’s.
    I still recall the great fit and classic designs!
    I got a job working at the BB store so I could afford to buy outfits. Sheath and A line were my favorites with coordinated sweaters.
    The for sharing blog! ❤

    Like

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