Ad Campaign – Maybelline, 1952

Perferred by Smart Women the World Over

All the mascara talk of a previous post made me be a bit nostalgic for Maybelline.  Actually, I still wear Maybelline Great Lash as I’ve never found a better replacement, especially for the money.  But I was curious to see what ads during the 50s and 60s had to say about my old favorite.  I never could locate one from the late 60s, so I decided to go with the early 50s.  What an air of mystery our enchanting ad girl portrays!

I also found an ad from the early 1940s, in which it stated that Maybelline came in three colors – brown, black and blue.  That’s right, blue!  And I thought that color came about in the 60s because we were so cool.  I loved the blue.  It was just so different from real lashes.

And I did located my little 1960s cake mascara.  The color is velvet black.  Yes, we all wanted velvet lashes.

17 Comments

Filed under Advertisements

17 responses to “Ad Campaign – Maybelline, 1952

  1. Zelle

    blue is also used here with the Pinaud brand that is exactly like this one, as i mentioned on your other post. I think they also make two kinds of black, one being smokey or light black. It exists since years, and has to be used exactly the way it appears on this note on the last image. What is making me want to get a couple of boxes before i leave spain. that is a great post and i love all this nostalgia.

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  2. seaside

    I still wear Maybelline mascara, too. Waterproof. I’ve never found better mascara, regardless of price. My sister, too.

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  3. I remember my mom having this on her makeup table. I thought it was the height of glamour!

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  4. Check out vintage Maybelline ads and it’s history from 1915 until 1985, at http://www.maybellinebook.com.

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  5. joanna

    My mom used to use the Maybelline cake mascara as an eyebrow pencil/wax.

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    • Oh that’s it! The little red box 😢! I’m 63 now but I can vividly see and remember watching my Mom standing at the bathroom sink and getting it out of the medicine cabinet and wetting that little “toothbrush”, rub it across the dark stuff (now I know it was called mascara) but she would use it on her eyebrows giving them a perfect arch by sweeping that little brush across them. She never used it on her lashes though. And she never wore anything else on her eyes. She had a beautiful complexion and only wore a compact powder on her face. I was probably 12ish and into my teens when I remember those times so it had to be in 1960s-1970s when I remember that word “Maybeline” the jingle that played on the commercial. Anyway I now have sparsely eyebrows from all the plucking them skinny in the 70’s and have tried almost everything to cover the greys and fill in the baldy parts that I thought of that little red box and if there was anything On the market replicating it.

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  6. Sheila Sasala

    I still have my mother’s cake Maybelline mascara. I love that she taught me how to use it and other cosmetics!

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  7. i love this old cake mascara..its a wonderful memory where can i buy one for my make up table?

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  8. Lori Auger

    do you still make this mascara my mother used to use it all the time I would love to get her some of it

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  9. I have this mascara total new baut very old i am not sure that is working
    I wanted to sell it on eBay as an old item so i was looking around about how much cost. I am so happy to meet your blog. I live in Greece.
    Nice to meet you!

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  10. One of the best article where they have covered all the history of mascara

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