Making The Easy Scarf Dress

I recently picked up this 1970s pattern because I was curious about the process of making a dress from two scarves.  This is just the type of thing I was into when I was in high school and college.  In fact, I once made a mini dress out of a pillowcase after seeing it done on a local “home-maker” TV program, but that’s another story for another time.

This pattern says it is easy, and after looking at the pattern piece and the directions, I agree.  This is easy:

That is the entire set of instructions for the dress!  It would take you longer to cut this out than it would take to sew it up.  Two side seams, two inches on either side of the neck, and Voila!  A new scarf mini dress.  No finishing and no hemming required.

Seriously, I think this is a really fun idea.  The scarves would not even have to be identical.  And notice that in the view on the far left, two sheer scarves were made into a bikini cover-up.  But if you are tall and want to wear this as a dress, I suggest 36″ scarves.  Or you could use a smaller size to make a top.

25 Comments

Filed under Sewing

25 responses to “Making The Easy Scarf Dress

  1. Now that sounds like my level of sewing ability! I’ll bookmark this for things to try out next year.

    If you make one, please post!

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  2. Fun pattern. It would make a great throw-over for the beach!

    I have a 60s Vogue pattern for a blouse made out of a scarf (http://vintagepatterns.wikia.com/wiki/Vogue_9977) but although I love the idea, I can never bear to cut into any of my scarves!

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  3. brenna

    Since I’m teaching myself to sew (with my mum saving the day on more than one occasion), I’m a bit obsessed with all things sewing. I’d love to see your results!

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  4. easy – and cute too!

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  5. It certainly IS a fun idea and I’m having a right giggle over the fact they made a pattern for this project!

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  6. It is so cool. I agree it would be hard to find scarves I could bear to cut; I’m confused by the directions though, where it says 3 sections….? It looks like only 2 pieces? Is that a typo? Thanks.

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  7. There is no reason to cut your scarves! Just tack at the shoulders as shown and sew together 3/4 of the way up the side seams. You will have drop-shoulder flutter sleeves, and you can belt (or dart) at will. Easy to undo if you want your scarves back.

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  8. Looks very easy indeed. As Lise mentions, it looks like there’s only 2 pieces to sew together but the pattern mentions 3. Is that a typo? 🙂

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  9. Not a typo. The top is one pattern piece, and the pants have 2 pieces, the front and the back.

    The top uses the same piece for the front and the back.

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  10. I get what you are saying about the pants but I’m referring to where the pattern says at the top “stitch front and back 3 sections together at top” it made me wonder is there a 3rd piece?

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  11. Very cute! It would be interesting to see how loose it is compared to the sketches because they seem drawn too slim to get into easily. It would probably need a belt – but would still be really cute!

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  12. This reminds me of the trend for tying a large bandana into a halter top when I was in junior high in the early 70s. Unfortunately, I wasn’t small enough on top to do this 😦

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  13. Oh I love that one! Are you going to make it?

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  14. Hmm, as far as scarves you can’t bear to cut up – this seems like a really good use for some of those good-quality scarves with a tragic stain or tear near the edge, which cost practically nothing at tag sales, flea markets, etc.

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  15. Pingback: Antique Sheer Scarf

  16. Pingback: Vintage Sewing – 1970s Butterick 5941 Scarf Top | The Vintage Traveler

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