Vintage Shopping with the Vintage Traveler

Once again, it’s time for a little shopping trip, this time to antique stores in east Tennessee and along I-26 in South Carolina.  Above you see what could possibly be the most interesting girdle produced in the 1960s.

Lilli Ann is a well-known (and coveted) label in the vintage world.  Most desired are the high quality suits and coats from the 1940s and 50s, but the company produced some interesting clothes in the 60s as well.  In the mid 60s and into the 70s they made some great dress and coat ensembles in a nice polyester knit, sort of mod for the married set.  This vest is made of wool knit and is made in Hong Kong which seems to put it in the early 60s.  I’m sure there was originally a matching dress or skirt.

That’s a lot of design.

The over-flowing hat basket is a commonly found feature of antique malls.  This one gets extra credit for being a double.

This is a close-up view of a 1890s bodice.  The fabric is velvet, and is beyond beautiful.

There were several Vested Gentress dresses at one store.  This one is a classic, with Briney Bear the dog and his nemesis, Pedro the parrot.

In 1919 the US Army had not quite given up on the horse.

This Caribbean themed fabric was interesting.  It was in three pieces, all the size of feedsacks, but it was rayon instead of cotton.  There were even stitch holes like are seen in deconstructed feedsacks.

Collier’s Weekly often featured sports on their covers.  I love that she’s reading a book titled, How to Ski.

This is a late 1930s dress for a preteen girl, which shows that even a ten-year-old wants a fashionable sleeve.

As long as I live I will never understand why anyone would cut up an old crochet piece so she can hot glue it to a pair of vintage (and almost antique) boots.  These are canvas, of the type made by Keds, though I’ll admit I was too upset to even look for a label.

When I was a kid in the 1960s, Evening in Paris was considered a cheap gift given by boys who were beyond clueless.  I do have to admit that this set from probably the early 50s is pretty nifty.

This bag is by John Romain, which looks to be an attempt by that company to keep up with the times.  Romain bags were popular in my area in the mid 1960s, but nobody was carrying them by the 70s.  Funny, though, to see a handbag with a piece symbol.  By that time it was all about the shoulder bag.

Cute Scotty dog sighting, but I was strong and left the pair for another dog lover.

And finally, possibly the largest item I have ever seen for sale in an antique store, a late 1940s Pontiac Silver Streak.

13 Comments

Filed under Road Trip, Shopping

13 responses to “Vintage Shopping with the Vintage Traveler

  1. Lauranett Lee

    Thanks for sharing – that was fun to read!

    Like

  2. poppysvintageclothing

    Some great finds, Lizzie…I understand about the boots!
    The “peace” symbol on that purse looks like an afterthought by it’s placement. Love that Evening in Paris box…it certainly wasn’t the greatest scent!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Lovely to read and see such great finds – thank you!

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  4. Thanks for bringing us along. I did not realize that the Vested Gentress animals had names! They were based right next door to here in Valley Forge and I do love some of the whimsical clothing they created. A bit too preppy for Mod Betty, but still some fun stuff.

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  5. Such great finds! I love the Vested Gentress and the Colliers cover.

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  6. If that orange and blue print had been on anything other than a girdle, I would have snatched it up!

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  7. Ginny Berry

    Great post as usual! I would love to have the Evening in Paris set. Just thinking of the scent brings memories.

    Like

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