The Rest of the Story, Glamour, 1944

Some time ago I posted this Glamour cover from 1944 and I asked the question, what are these two young women discussing?  It seems as if they were wearing the same coat design.  I’m still not completely sure about the conversation, but I now know the identity of the woman on the right.  Last week I got an email from her grandson who is working on a family project.  I asked if he could tell me a little about his grandmother, and his answer was a bit of a surprise.

Thank you! I would be happy to.  My grandmother’s name is Dina Merrill.  She is 93 years old now.  She is a well known actress and you could learn much more on google than I could tell you.  After she graduated from the University of Wisconsin, she moved to New York in 1941 (despite her parents’ objections) and insisted she paid her way through acting school (Academy of Dramatic Arts) by modeling for Conde Nast, even though her parents (Marjorie Merriweather Post  and  E.F. Hutton) were extremely wealthy. Anyway, she put her acting on hold when she met, fell in love and married my grandfather, Stanley M. Rumbough, Jr. in 1946 and started a family. They had three  children (the oldest is my dad) and once she felt they were old enough, decided to pursue her career.  So, she changed her name to Dina Merrill from Nedenia Hutton and landed her first movie, Desk Set with Katherine Hepburn & Spencer Tracy. Then the rest is history.
You just never know who is going to show up in old fashion magazines.  Here’s another photo of Nedenia/Dina modeling a hat in Glamour.

9 Comments

Filed under Rest of the Story

9 responses to “The Rest of the Story, Glamour, 1944

  1. Aren’t they upset that they are wearing such similar coats? They are each looking with disdain at the coat of the other.

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  2. That’s what I thought. or else something pregnancy related, but Young Marrieds weren’t the Glamour audience. Interesting about Dina Merrill. She did look vaguely familiar.

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  3. I think they just found out what the men in the office (pre-war) were paid for doing the same work…. “Glamour for the girl with a job.”

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  4. seweverythingblog

    Lovely story!

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  5. Small world….the article was most interesting. Thanks for sharing.

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  6. What a great story! I love Desk Set.

    I think witness2fashion’s scenario sounds about right. 😀

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  7. Wonderful what you can find out through internet connections. So glad you share with us Lizzie.

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  8. Ruth

    Green coat is telling purple coat she got it cheaper at the other store. The magazine is advertising a “Good Values” article and that’s what it makes me think of. I truly doubt if they would have been talking about the men making more at the same time as women were outnumbering men in the work force at the time. Although, they could have been discussing what the boorish make manager had said.

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  9. Great background story on a beautiful woman! But you won’t convince me that who she was didn’t play a part in landing her jobs.

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