Shopping with the Vintage Traveler

I’ve been shopping again, this time mainly in the Franklin, NC area, and in Asheville. By shopping, I really mean looking, because I actually don’t buy many things at all. But I look at window shopping as an education of sorts, and it’s a rare day spent in antique stores that I don’t learn or see something new.

I really liked this Scoreze handy golf score pad, and would have bought it except I felt the price was too high. I’ve found a few online, and most of them are in the same price range, but I’m just not willing to pay what people are asking. The price reflects the fact that the store display is intact, but all I want is the little pad and holder. I’m sure I’ll eventually run across one.

It’s rare that I even talk about prices.  Most importantly, it’s my wish that people reading this blog think of the items I present more as historical artifacts, and less as items to be bought and sold. When I see an item that I want to add to my collection, what the item is “worth” is not a big consideration, but unfortunately, the price tag is.

Having spent some time as a vintage seller, I understand that sellers deserve to get fair prices for the goods they sell.  It’s not an easy job. Finding great stuff to resell is getting harder all the time as attics are emptied. So for the most part, I don’t complain about prices.

I thought this was interesting.  I had to look up the history of Trader Vic’s, and to my surprise, there are still a few locations in operation.  This is older, as the prices prove:

I could really go for some Cosmo Tidbits about now.

I really hope there are some collectors out there who are saving all the great vintage kids’ garments. Sometimes the cuteness is just overwhelming.

This is the oldest Rit Dye case I’ve ever come across.

I love how a few well-placed scallops can make a boot look pretty.

I live for a stack of good antique magazines. I usually don’t buy copies of the Ladies’ Home Journal, but I do love the covers.

This card was a new one to me.

They may be making fun of Miss Fishley, but she was wearing a really great bathing suit.

Things like this always confuse me. Why would anyone have eight copies of the same cookbook for sale?

If you are ever in Asheville, NC, and have time to visit only one antique store, make it Magnolia Beauregard’s on Broadway. The store has been in business for decades, and is just as interesting now as it was years ago when I was just learning about historical clothing.

I know there is more to the story of this item.  It is the cover of a songbook, dated 1928.  Interesting that a flooring company would be producing a musical “frolic”.  Maybe it was put on by the employees, as the Fulton Opera House is also in Lancaster, PA.  I can’t help but wonder if the performers wore a version of the pajamas seen in the illustration.

Outing is one of my favorite sources for information on sportswear from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  The issues are online, but it was fun seeing an issue in the wild.

 

10 Comments

Filed under Shopping

10 responses to “Shopping with the Vintage Traveler

  1. poppysvintageclothing

    Always a pleasure reading your blog, Lizzie. You have a knack seeking out the interesting items that people can often ignore.

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  2. Didnt corporations put on elaborate commissioned shows at trade conventions back in the day?

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  3. marcia g

    I’m with you on the cookbooks. Why would you buy one of the eight when they appear to be a dime a dozen? I’ll get one at the next garage sale, thank you.
    There used to be a store in my neighborhood that did the same thing with today’s items-50 Christmas angels at a time. Never bought a thing for that reason.
    Love your shopping posts.

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  4. Lizzie, what fun! Any idea if those dresses are for sale? I’ll have to stop by when we’re there in April.

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  5. Well, if you even make it to Southern California, we can go to Trader Vic’s together. I think it is best known for big, exotic cocktails with umbrellas stuck in them.

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