1920s Gingham Romper

About a year ago I went on a rant over how some vintage clothing sellers and buyers have changed the vocabulary of certain garments in order to made them seem more versatile. In particular I was irritated about the use of the word “romper” when the object in question was obviously a gym suit or a bathing suit. I even went so far as to say that women did not wear rompers, that the romper is a garment for a baby or a toddler.

I never like being wrong, but when I am it pleases me that my fellow fashion history lovers care enough to set me straight.  After posting the rant I got an email from Lynne (otherwise known as the best online researcher I know) that contained a 1920s sewing pattern for a woman that was clearly labeled a romper. She also sent along a photo of a very similar garment she has in her own collection.

Properly corrected, I then set off to find an example for my collection.  Last week I finally was able to add the one seen above. There is no doubt this is a garment for an adult, and it is also apparent that this is an outer garment, not lingerie.

Notice that there are snap closures on both shoulders and another on the front of the neck.  This made it easy for the wearer to put on the romper by stepping into it and pulling it up.

The tie belt sits on the top of the hips, giving a proper 1920s silhouette.

The inside legs and the crotch are shaped with the use of a wide gusset. There is elastic in the legs, but it is old, crunchy, and it no longer stretches. I’ll not replace it, but if this ever goes on display some new elastic can be inserted along side the old.

The shoulders have those handy little lingerie strap holders that prevented that embarrassing bra strap slip-up.

I’m quite sure this romper was made at home rather than purchased. The construction is very good, but there are a few places where alterations were made while the garment was being made. There is also quite a bit of hand-stitching.

I tried to locate the photos Lynne sent to me, but failed. I did find an example of a Butterick sewing pattern for a romper in a post at Witness2Fashion. It was included in a feature of costume party patterns. I located another, very similar one from McCall Patterns. 

So rompers definitely were a thing for women, at least in the 1920s and 1930s. Still, I don’t agree with calling a gym suit a romper, no matter how much the garment is similar. In fact, my romper here looks to be a direct descendant of my circa 1915 gym suit.

10 Comments

Filed under 1920s fashion, Collecting, Curiosities, Gymnasium, Sportswear, Summer Sports

10 responses to “1920s Gingham Romper

  1. I have never run across a 1920s romper either. This is fascinating! I wonder if yours was a costume or a summer outfit?

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  2. Pretty n pink ! while we know it’s vintage-looks/could-look new!

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  3. It’s so important to get the right terminology!

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  4. kickshawproductions

    Okay, so maybe the romper is a correct term… I date anyone to find a ‘wiggle’ dress description for a sheath dress!

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  5. Carol Mitchell

    Right now they are actually making rompers for men(g) I bought a-nonvintage garment that I think of as a modified romper for exercising-strapless and made of terry cloth and without fasteners.

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  6. Pingback: 1929 Perfetex Athletic Clothing Style Book | The Vintage Traveler

  7. Pingback: Update: 1920s Gingham Romper | The Vintage Traveler

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