White Stag Ski Togs Promotional Brochure

A recent addition to my sportswear archive is this little folder from White Stag of Portland, Oregon. It isn’t dated, but from the style of the clothing, I can say it is late 1940s.

Thanks to @noaccountingfortaste on Instagram, I can tell you a bit about the illustrator of the cover. She was Gereldine Olinger Hinkle Abbot, or as she signed this picture, Gerry.

Jessica wrote,”She was born in Washington state; in 1944, she and her first husband moved to San Francisco, and by 1946 she was working for Lilli Ann as art director and advertising manager. She also lived and worked in Portland, illustrating for Jantzen and White Stag and numerous department stores. In 1950, she won the Frances Holmes Achievement Award for advertising women of the West, an award named for the first woman to open her own ad agency, in Los Angeles. She won three awards; one for best layout series, best mechanical production, and best finished art series for work she’d done for the firm Frederick and Nelson, and was given the overall achievement award because she “…best typified how a woman can achieve outstanding merit in the world of advertising.” She opened her own agency, Gerry Advertising and Art Service.”

Inside the folder is a little dictionary of ski terms, and several cards that have photos of the latest ski fashions. In this period of time, ski pants, and usually jackets as well, were made of wool gabardine, this is thin and light, though dense and warm. The pants were pleated at the waist to give the wearer greater mobility.

This is a pretty standard ski suit from the late 1940s. The shoulders are still wide, and the pants are roomy. It would be only a few years before Willi and Maria Bogner of Germany discovered that thick nylon knit made a sleek and effective ski pant and changed the style completely.

Here the pants are gabardine, but the jackets in made of cotton poplin. White stag started as a canvas tent makers, and they continued to work with cotton fabrics.

This is the Ski Banner style described in the photo above. On the back of each card is a brief description and the price. At $14.95 and $16.95, these togs weren’t cheap. According to the inflation calculator, the jacket would be 171.63 and the pants would be $194.59 in 1017 dollars.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Winter Sports

2 responses to “White Stag Ski Togs Promotional Brochure

  1. Schuss Puss! I have never heard that one. These advertising brochures are treasures. And I am constantly in awe of at @noaccountingfortaste’s research into the history of American designers.

    Like

  2. Connie Turner

    White Stag was a high end brand when I was a child and now the logo appears at Walmart on T shirts and other casual wear. They are still well made.

    Like

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