1960s Dulottes by Serbin

Well, it looks like I’m sort of back in business, with a shiny new laptop and a huge learning curve. A lot of changes have occurred to computing in the past eight years and I’m slowly figuring out how to work this new machine. I’m still trying to improve on my photo editing, so please excuse the below par pictures in this post.

I first spotted this great culotte dress on the Vintage Fashion Guild forum. Every week member sellers show off what is new in their shops in a feature called Fresh Vintage, and it’s a great way to see “new” things as they hit the stores. This came from the etsy shop of member Racked Vintage.

At first glance this looks to be a dress, but it is actually a culotte dress, and I’m pretty sure it was designed as a golfing outfit. The front of the skirt is a bit full, which tends to disguise that the skirt is divided.

The back goes even farther with the deception, as there is a skirt panel sewn over the culottes so that from the back it looks like a straight skirt.

My thinking is that the garment would have been very useful in places where the dress code required women to wear skirts in the clubhouse. It would also be useful in transforming from golf course to city street.

Another feature that shows the duo nature of this piece is the large removable pocket. It’s quite necessary when trying to keep up with the paraphernalia of golf, but off the course it just looks a bit odd. So the designer put the pocket on the belt where it slides off and on.

My photos are so poor color-wise. This dress is a very pretty yellow, and the birds, while not always accurately colored, are in nice shades of red, gold, blue and green.

I had never seen this label before this dress, and I love how it hints at the two functions of the dress. The owner got a duo of dresses in one.

I got a bit lucky in researching the label as Serbin had the name dulottes trademarked. At first glance this dress appears to be from the early 1960s, but according the the trademark application, the label was first used in 1967. There are often mistakes in trademark applications, due mainly to the passage of years between the time the name was first used and the time the application was made.  But in this case the first usage and the application both happened in August, 1967, so I’m sure it is correct.

In 1967 and 68 there was a softening of women’s fashion. The mod look was still going strong, especially among the young, but if you look at magazines from the later 60s you see a bit of traditional femininity returning in the form of gathered waists, soft collars, and even ruffles and lace. I’d put this dress in the spring of 1968. Now to find an ad to support that bold claim!

 

 

3 Comments

Filed under Collecting, Sportswear, Summer Sports

3 responses to “1960s Dulottes by Serbin

  1. jacq staubs

    Sweet little outfit. Remember Serbin-also my girlfriend (1965) and I escorted on a Sunday afternoon In Washington on a “date” . After leaving her house – her mother turned around and ask what she had on. She replied Doulottes -We turned around /back to her house! “Never on Sunday in Washington her mother exclaimed ! Wow have things changed. Your photos have always been great!

    Like

  2. New equipment is a challenge, but your post was fine! I recently changed from a 1992 electronic (not computerized) Bernina to a 2018 computerized Janome. I had the Janome manual booklet spiral bound at the copy shop after realizing I would be consulting it every time I sew, which I do not enjoy. But my 1962 Singer 301 does not easily do decorative stitches, zigzag or buttonholes so I need both. (I have Singer attachments but I find them even more puzzling than the LCD screen in the Janome).

    Like

  3. What a truly unique find!! And that name! Dulottes! Brilliant!

    Like

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