Shopping with The Vintage Traveler – Winter, 2019

Most of my actual shopping lately has been of the online variety. I have been looking locally, but not very much. Between a bit of redecorating my office and a few minor health glitches (bad cold and stubborn back pain) I’ve spent more time at home than usual. I am, like most of the rest of the Northern Hemisphere, ready for spring and flea market season.

But I have spotted a few things that I thought were interesting, though the office clean-out has made me pickier when actually buying. So here’s what I saw, but did not buy.

The illustration above is from a 1917 catalog for men’s suit salesmen. The lady is perfectly dressed in a sporty ensemble. But why isn’t he in uniform? Navy must not have been playing Army. And what about that goat mascot? The tradition of Navy having a live goat mascot goes back to 1893.

There seems to be a collegiate theme to today’s post. In the first two decades of the 20th century, postcard collecting was a popular hobby, and so postcards for every subject were made. College cards were often illustrated with young women along with a sports theme. At the time this card was made, circa 1906, women were admitted to Penn, but there were no sports teams for them, and certainly not football. They were allowed to watch.

Continuing with the college angle, here was a whole wall of pennants, some school related, others having been bought by tourists.

I had never heard of Savannah Beach, and can’t find a reference to it today. The nearest beach to Savannah is Tybee Island.

This bit of needlework reminds me of a 1930s Christmas card.

I almost bought this Arts and Crafts bag. I thought it was a bit overpriced, and so I left it. I did start thinking about it later and had a bit of non-buyer’s remorse.

This is a block used to print textiles. These are still in use today in parts of Asia, and so I have no idea how old it actually is. Still, it’s an item I never see and so I enjoyed it, even though the seller thought it was crap.

Japanese women meet  psychedelic print. This sort of thing was common in the late 1960s and early 1970s, due partly to the popularity of Peter Max.

Always invite the dog to your tea parties.

Here’s a good example of vintage “up-cycling”. I have seen antique paisley shawls turned into dresses and robes and even quilts, but this is the first handbag I’ve ever found.

This was another “almost” purchase. Anyone who collects vintage menswear needs to seek out copies of this magazine. It is excellent.

If not for the patch I would have thought this cardigan dated from the 1930s or 30s. All the older ones I’ve seen are a slightly different style. Live and learn.

And as a surprise, here’s an item I did actually buy. I found this sweet 1940s wool clutch at my Goodwill bins. This has been an item on my “wish list” for sometime, but I wanted one that was a little special. You may be asking, “What makes this one nice enough to meet The Vintage Traveler’s high standards?”

It’s not just a purse, it is also a muff!

12 Comments

Filed under I Didn't Buy..., Shopping

12 responses to “Shopping with The Vintage Traveler – Winter, 2019

  1. Marie

    Love the purse/muff. Didn’t know such a thing existed. Now I want one!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That purse is a fabulous find! And, thanks for the info on the Men’s magazine. Much appreciated!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Unrelated…and not-Vintage but I hope you made it to the African Wax Print fashion exhibit in Charlotte at the Mint Museum. I think it’s leaving this week. It was Amazing!

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  4. Well, I wish you had bought that textile print block for me! And you should get some award for treasure spotting at Goodwill.

    Like

  5. jacq staubs

    Talk about the “slim fit”! The figure on the cover of the menswear catalog is an obvious exaggeration of artistic license ? Wonderful cover. My mother had a black fox fur muff with a built in purse. Thank you for the menswear info.

    Like

  6. Love that arts and crafts purse, too. Perhaps the price is negotiable?

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  7. Savannah Beach is Tybee Island. I’m not sure when the name “Savannah Beach” ceased to be used in reference to the beach itself. In one of the tourist shops on Tybee, you could still purchase some old stickers (from the 70s?) that said Savannah Beach up until a few years ago.

    Liked by 1 person

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