Category Archives: Ad Campaign

Ad Campaign – Ship ‘n Shore, 1957

 

for the feel of luxury… whisper-soft acrilan knit sweater blouses

One of my all-time favorite ad campaigns was run by blouse maker Ship ‘n Shore in 1957.   Even though by the late 1950s photography was replacing fashion illustration, they went with an illustrator who captured the lines and details of the blouses beautifully.

Even though the ads are lovely, the campaign didn’t last long.  By the end of the year Ship ‘n Shore was back to using photographs to advertise their blouses.

You can see two more of the ads in a post from last year.

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Ad Campaign – Tussy, 1960

Your Guardian Angel or Tussy Deodorant

It’s wonderful the way Tussy Cream Deodorant protects you and your skin.

Tussy’s gentle cosmetic base doesn’t irritate normal skin, while the specially balanced formula checks perspiration, stops odor… without danger to fabrics, too.

Guard your charms with Tussy Cream Deodorant every day.  It never lets you down!

I’ve got to find one of those guardian angels.  It looks much easier than having to apply deodorant myself.  I wonder if it will do make-up and nails as well.

It is interesting that the ad mentions that Tussy Cream will not damage fabrics.  Even today it’s hard to find a good product that does not leave a residue on fabrics.

 

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Ad Campaign – Jantzen All-Sports Jackets, 1947

a’hunting you can go… and fishing you can go and that’s not all!  These new Jantzen jackets are as versatile as all outdoors.  They’re for golfing. holidaying, going to college or relaxing, for everything that’s fun to do…

You really can’t ask more of a jacket than that.

Today it is always news when a fashion company moves into a new line, say when a maker of menswear develops a line for women.  If you look back over the history of clothing companies you can see that this is how the industry has operated over the years.  Expansion often meant veering from the product for which the company was known.  In this case Jantzen, which was a long-time maker of swimsuits, was dipping their toes in the sportswear waters.  They had developed a line called “Sun Clothes” which was mainly tee shirts and shorts, but they were also expanding into winter sports.

I have no idea how successful this idea was, but with the exception of 1940s figural sweaters, I don’t see a lot of winter time Jantzen that is older than the 1960s.

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Ad Campaign – Bobbie Brooks, 1957

Luscious lambswool intarsia sweaters by Bobbie Brooks and a dyed-to-match skirt

A magnificent look… yours in either beige heather or grey heather.

What I found interesting about this ad from 1957 was the use of the word “intarsia.”  I strongly suspect that if I were to stand on the corner of a busy street and ask random strangers what an intarsia sweater is that very few of them would know, the exceptions being knitters and textile fanatics.  But there it was in 1957 being used as a selling point in an ad as if anyone reading it would know the term.

I was too young in 1957 to have any idea about this, but what about my older readers?  Did intarsia sweaters mean anything to you?

For the non-knitters reading, intarsia is a technique of using different blocks of color like you see in all three sweaters above. For each block the other color is not carried across the back of the knitting like is commonly seen in patterned sweaters.

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Veteran’s Day, 1919

Repost from 11/11/11

This ad is from 1919, a year in which Americans were seeing the return of many injured servicemen from WWI.  America had a bit of a romanticized view of the war, being so far removed from the horrors that Europe was experiencing, and even after the war ended, and many men came home with their rose-colored glasses removed, the public was pretty much unaware of the horrendous experience of it all.

This ad came form a 1919 Harper’s Bazar.  Many of the stories in the magazine, and in others from 1919, refer to returning soldiers,  and to the war, but there really is no mention of just how bad an experience it had been.  In the stories, there seems to be no “shell shock,”  no poison gas, no death.

I guess it would have been worth it had one of the names for WWI been true – “The War to End All Wars.”  But unfortunately, they were wrong in 1919.

 

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Ad Campaign – Dalton Cashmere, 1956

The Dalton Twins Dash from Desk to Date.

Wendy is Dalton’s captivating sweater of 100% pure imported cashmere… color matched with its own slim svelte skirt of Stroock’s pure cashmere or cashmere blends.

Dalton was founded in 1949 by Arthur Dery and Maurice Saltzman (who was also the owner of Bobbie Brooks), and was  headquartered in Cleveland and  Willoughby, Ohio.  Dalton was best known for their cashmere sweaters, but they also made woolen skirts that were dyed to match the sweaters.  I found the reference to Stroock interesting, as that company’s label is usually found in cashmere and fine wool coats.  For much of the twentieth century Sylvan Stroock’s company was the leading US maker of luxury wools.

And when was the last time you saw the words “captivating” or “svelte” in an advertisement?

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Ad Campaign – James Kenrob, 1962

Here’s that girl again… in “Americana” Double Knit-mates

Best of the new – sleek wool double knits to mate in seventeen plus ways.  Newest of the new – boldly printed fut blend cardigans that top everything.  The whole kitten’ kaboodle from our “Americana” collection priced to please college and career budgets.

As the ad says, James Kenrob was a division of Dalton.  Dalton was one of the major cashmere makers in the US, and they made wool skirts to coordinate with their high quality sweaters.  In 1959 Dalton registered the James Kenrob trademark.  Under that label the company produced double knits in both wool and synthetic fibers.

I really, really do love this sweater.  I have a thing for argyle and harlequin prints, and I think the color combination of green and blue looks so fresh.  And how about that coordinating cushion and headband, not to mention her hair and the apple!

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