Tag Archives: 1921

Lady Fair Yarn Book No. 3, 1921

I have laughingly called myself a Goodwill Archaeologist, but the very nature of digging through the bins at my local Goodwill Outlet does resemble the work of archaeology in some respects.  First, there is the obvious reference to “digging” but there are other similarities.

It is important to note the location of a find.  An archaeologist may find one piece of pottery in a location, and will then be on the alert for more pieces in the same area.  In the same way, a Goodwill Archaeologist knows that if there is one piece of old stuff in a bin, there is a nice likelihood that there will be more.  I have been through bins that held a lifetime of embroidered linens.  Sometimes a bin will contain the entire series of Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys books.  If one great item is spotted in a bin, then it is worth taking more time to closely examine the contents of that, and the surrounding, bins.

This strategy paid off  this week when I spotted a few old knitting and crocheting instruction booklets.  These were sold by the millions, mainly by the makers of yarns and threads.  The ones from the 1940s and 50s are pretty common, but I always take a look at them to see if there are any sportswear booklets.

I very quickly pulled out about one hundred booklets from the bin, being careful to excavate the entire area.  A closer look later revealed that the great majority of the booklets were on making various crochet edgings and laces.  But in the midst of all the doilies and laces, I found a real treasure.  The Lady Fair Yarn Book No. 3 was published in 1921 by the T. Eaton Co., one of the great Canadian department stores.

This booklet has forty pages of sports fashions for the entire family.  Being Canadian, there are lots of sweaters for skating and hockey, but there are garments for golf and tennis as well.

Lady Fair was Eaton’s house brand of yarns.  Many of the designs featured angora yarn, as in the tuxedo sweater above.

This suit, recommended for golf, was quite fashionable.

There were not just sweaters and dresses, but also accessories,  such as hats and scarves.

The instructions for this bathing suit also included directions for the stockings.  I found several things to be interesting.  First, that the stockings were knee length, when in the early Twenties it was still the custom in the US to wear full length stockings with bathing attire.  The custom for this varied from place to place, with some beaches in Europe already having done away with stockings by the 1920s.

But what I really love about this bathing suit is how complicated it is, with the straps and buttons and belt and contrasting color trunks that were not attached to the body of the bathing suit.

There were included a large variety of men’s sweaters, for activities like skating and golf.

This garment for a boy might be called overalls, but I’m betting it was more like underwear, wouldn’t you agree?

 

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Filed under Collecting, Curiosities, Proper Clothing, Winter Sports

Famous Fain Knitted Outerwear, 1921

I love old knitwear catalogs, and for the most part have to be contented with the catalogs because the actual sweaters just have not survived in great numbers.  They rarely come up for sale, and when they do they cost more than my parents paid for my first car.

I had never heard of the famous Fain company, but Google books delivered a lot of information in the form of a 1922 issue of Textile World magazine.  The company was started in Brooklyn in 1912 as a maker of knitted swimsuits.  At first their daily output was two dozen suits a day, which they sold at the mill, directly to consumers.  The next year they added machinery to make sweaters and Fain began to grow, but they maintained their business model of selling directly to consumers.  In 1918 a Fain store was opened in Brooklyn, and by 1922 there were six stores, all in Brooklyn and Manhattan, and there was a plan for a new factory and store in the Garment District.  As far as I can tell, Fain sold only through their own stores.  My catalog is not for mail order, but is just a sort of preview of the new styles available in the Fain stores.

Interestingly, the Fain family also started a wholesale division, which was called Navy Knitting Mills.  Between the two parts of the company, the Fains sold $3.5 million in bathing suits, sweaters, hosiery, scarves, caps and various other accessories in 1922.  I’m not sure what went wrong, but Navy Knitting Mills went into bankruptcy in 1923, and Fain went into receivership in 1925.

But in the fall of 1921, things at Fain were looking good.

Fain offered a large range of prices, as you can see above.  Model No. 3008 was made from an “Extra Heavy Weight Zephyr” while No. 3101 was made from a thinner weight.  Still, the detailing on both is very nice, and I’ve made the photos clickable so you can see the details better.  I especially love the way both sweaters slip through a hole and then button to secure.

And for pricing reference, in 1921 $14.95 calculates to $212.07 in 2015 buying power, and $4.95 was worth $70.22.

Fain also made a wide range of wool accessories, like these scarves.  The more expensive one is made of camel’s hair.

Or how about a sport coat and matching tam of brushed alpaca?  Note that one woman is holding ice skates, and the other, a hockey stick.  These were clothes for the sporty set.

I’m not much of a cape person, but I do love these two models, especially the plaid one.

So, what do you think: is this a little girl or a little boy?  Does it matter?  There is a lot of talk today about whether it is right to instill sexual stereotypes in our children by way of dress.  Perhaps we should return to the days when little children were just children.

There were two models in the catalog that if seen out of context, might be misidentified as being from the 1930s.  I’m referring to the red model above and the blue one several photos above.  These are not what one visualizes when thinking 1920s fashion.  To my eye they look like they are ten years too early, but it may be that the company wanted to make a few models for those who were resisting the longer torso of the late Teens and early Twenties.

By looking at model No. 4018 it is easy to see the inspiration for the shawl-collared sweaters that were so popular in the 1970s.  Could there be a more cozy garment on a crisp fall day?  In the early Seventies I had a sewing pattern that included a shawl-collared sweater, and I scoured the local textile mill outlets looking for heavy knit goods with which to sew up my own sweaters.  I wish I’d known about those clever buttoned closures which are so much nicer than the bulky tie belts included with the pattern.

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Filed under Collecting, Proper Clothing, Winter Sports

Bradley Knit Wear Style Book, 1921 – 1922

More from the Bradley Knit Wear Company – a sweater catalog from 1921.

“Navajos are the original and exclusive Bradley contribution to knit coat wearers.  The knitting of authentic Indian designs through the body and sleeves of the garment individualizes Bradley Navajos among knitted coats.”

What an interesting use of American Indian images and designs.  Of course, the Indian portrayed is not Navajo, and I doubt that the designs were either.  In the 1930s the Navajos took Beacon Blankets to court to stop their usage of the tribe’s name.  I wonder if they took the same step with Bradley?

Bathing suits were such a large part of Bradley’s business that even the winter catalog had an illustration to remind the shopper to buy a Bradley suit!

Posted by KeLLy Ann:

I want one of everything! 

Wednesday, March 3rd 2010 @ 4:20 PM

Posted by Sarah:

Its funny how blithely these early 20th century manufacturers appropriated native American culture, with little regard to accuracy or cultural sensitivity! I’d like to hope that wouldn’t happen these days, but I’m not so sure (I’ve been reading a few blog posts recently about fashion’s plundering of ethnic and regional dress so I’m particularly aware of the issue right now!) 

That said, what a marvellous catalogue – I love the long line cardigans and those cosy-looking big knit hats!

Thursday, March 4th 2010 @ 10:04 AM

Posted by Lizzie:

This longish type sweater was very popular when I was in college – mid 1970s .  I loved them – cozy and easy to wear. 

A lot of companies built their business on copying Indian designs – Beacon and Pendleton years ago, Ralph Lauren more recently. Give me an authentic vintage Chimayo jacket anyday!

Friday, March 5th 2010 @ 9:18 AM


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