Tag Archives: Catalina

Late 1950s Catalina Play-Alongs Plus Swimsuit

I found and bought the shirt above so many years ago that I have no recollection or record of its purchase. I know it has to be at least twenty years or so because for a long time it was actually in my closet. But I stopped wearing vintage on a regular basis long ago, mainly because I am so sloppy, and I was afraid of ruining things.

About the same time I began collecting sportswear more seriously, and so the blouse was added to my growing pile of old clothes. I especially loved the label, Catalina Play-Abouts, but since it went into the collection I really haven’t thought much about it.

But, as it so happens, I ran across a set of blouse and bathing suit of this print on etsy. I really wanted the swimsuit, but because I already had the blouse, I decided to think about it before buying. As luck would have it, someone posted just the swimsuit on Instagram, but before I could buy it, the posting disappeared.

By this time I was fairly discouraged, but not so much that I didn’t check the usual vintage venues. And there it was, on etsy, and a bit cheaper than the last one. My luck was improving.

A few days later, another set surfaced on Instagram – this time a bathing suit and matching skirt. But the print was in orange and yellow. But that started me on a further search.

I went back to etsy, and that time a skirt, in blue, surfaced. That brought my set to three matching pieces.

After posting the blouse and the bathing suit on Instagram, Liza of Better Dresses Vintage emailed some newspaper ads she found. The first one for Catalina Play-Abouts was dated 1953, and the last one was from 1960. Best of all, one from 1958 looked a lot like my bathing suit. And even more important was the information that there were also shorts and pedal pushers in the Play-Alongs lines.

After looking all over the internet, I finally found (on Pinterest) this image from a 1959 ad.  I can’t tell what the model is holding, but it might be a shawl or coverup. And I now know the print was made in a matching cabana set for guys.

The addition of this tag is also interesting. The fabric was apparently designed for Catalina, and there is also a copyright statement on the selvage of the fabric that I located in the skirt. And after looking at all the different photos of this fabric in extant garments, I noted that the bathing suits were not all the same design. There were three different suits that I have found.

The buttons on the skirt and blouse are plastic, shaped and painted to resemble bamboo. It’s a nice touch.

So the hunt for more of this line is on. I’m positive they are out there.

 

8 Comments

Filed under Collecting, Sportswear, Summer Sports, Vintage Clothing

Schiaparelli for Catalina Swimsuit, 1949, Part II

Click to enlarge

 

In reading about the Schiaparelli for Catalina swim suit I recently bought I discovered that, according to an advertisement, that this suit was the “Official Swim Suit of the Atlantic City Miss America Pageant.” That sent me on an internet search to see if I could actually find photos of the contestants wearing this particular suit.  When I came up  empty I just assumed that it was Catalina suits in general that were the official suit of the pageant.

To my surprise and delight, I got the above photo in my inbox last night.  Julie of Jet Set Sewing saw my Schiaparelli suit and thought it looked familiar.  Then she realized that a photo of the 1948 contestants wearing the suit was hanging in her home.  Julie’s husband found the photo in a shop in Paris.

As you can see, it is the Schiaparelli swim suit, but with the addition of the Catalina flying fish logo.  And even though this was the 1948 Miss America contest, the suit was not made commercially until the next year.  Thus, all my searches for “Miss America Catalina 1949” brought up a different set of swim suits.

Even though the power of Google is great and it so often leads us to the correct information, it makes me happy that it was a friend who provided the breakthrough on this one.  Thanks, Julie!

Click to enlarge

 

8 Comments

Filed under Curiosities, Rest of the Story, Sportswear, Summer Sports

Schiaparelli for Catalina Swimsuit, 1949

Some people might think that designer collaborations with mass market manufacturers is a new idea, but they actually go back at least to 1916 when Lucile’s – Lady Duff-Gordon – name began appearing the the Sears Roebuck catalog.  By the 1930s California swimsuit maker Catalina was calling on the designers of Hollywood films to do an occasional suit for them.

I haven’t been able to find any concrete information about the Schiaparelli for Catalina collection, except for the fact that it was in 1949.  The suits were widely advertised so there is a good record of the various suits designed by Schiaparelli.  It’s interesting that I’ve not found reference to this collaboration in any of my print sources, including Schiap’s autobiography, Shocking Life, and the catalog that accompanied the 2003 Shocking! exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

In an ad in the Spokane Daily Chronicle, May 13, 1949, this suit was touted as the “Official Swim Suit of the Atlantic City Miss America Pageant.”

The best fitting swim suit in the county… and hailed by the nation’s prize-winning beauties!  It’s “Cable Mio,” designed by the world-famous Schiaparelli exclusively for Catalina!  White wool cables on Celanese and Lastex Knit.  It’s a convertible – can be worn with or without straps.

The design is achieved purely through the cutting of the fabric to form chevrons.  It’s amazing the effect that can be made through a bit of creative planning and stitching!

 

 

I’m sorry about of the quality of this 1949 ad.  It’s a scan of a scan…  I’m still trying to locate my original and I will post a better image when I find it.

Purchased from Ballyhoo Vintage, who always has a great selection of vintage swimwear.

19 Comments

Filed under Designers, Sportswear, Summer Sports

Harlequin Print Top from Catalina

Catalina is another of those great old sportswear companies that I love to find.  It was located in California, a fact that the company used in their branding.  Many of the labels brag that Catalina was a “California Creator,” and that their products were “Styled for the Stars of Hollywood.”  In the early years they were mainly a maker of bathing suits, but they moved into sportswear by the 1940s.  Especially great were the figural design sweaters they made.

I found the blouse above several weeks ago, and I’ve spent some time thinking about it.  If not for that exaggerated collar, it is pretty typical of the late 1950s and early 60s.  But that crazy collar might make someone assume that this is a product of the 70s.

It is not.  Collar aside, this shirt dates from that period of time – the late 1950s and early 1960s – when people had an ongoing love of all thing Italian.  That included harlequin prints, Sophia Loren and Emilio (Pucci) of Capri.

harlequin-inspired designs from Emilio (Pucci) of Capri from a 1957 McCall’s mini-catalog

 

Besides the styling and the fabric, the label points to an early Sixties date.  This blue label was only used for a short time at Catalina, and while I don’t know the exact dates, all the garments I have ever seen with it date from the late 1950s or early 60s.  You can see a lot of Catalina labels on the VFG Label Resource.  While the Resource does not always lead to an exact dating, it is invaluable in giving a general idea of when a particular label was used.

The rolled short sleeves and the squared-off hem with side vents are commonly seen features in casual clothing of this era.

13 Comments

Filed under Sportswear, Vintage Clothing

Catalina Sweater, 1946

The other day when I said that I enjoyed getting emails from readers who have something interesting to share, I was hoping it would inspire a few good letters.  I was not disappointed!

Sarah in California sent photos of a Catalina sweater she found.  She knew I’d like it because of the ad above, which I posted five years ago.  You see, her sweater is very similar to the one in the back of the ad, with the same pattern and the tie ends.  She says that even the fit is the same.  It’s always fun to find an ad for a vintage item, especially something like a sweater which can be pretty difficult to place a date on.

Photos courtesy of and copyright of Sarah Roussin.

11 Comments

Filed under Collecting, Vintage Clothing

Ad Campaign – Catalina, 1957

For me… for mine… sweetheart swimsuits and Play-abouts. In MADRAS the India born sun cloth!

Since Pam of Glamoursplash mentioned in the comments earlier that Catalina is now being sold at Walmart, I thought I’d show an ad from the past.  If you have sharp eyes you can see that the  woman’s swimsuit is $10.95.

Out of curiosity, I checked the Walmart website to see the Catalina line.  The designs were a mixed bag – some awful, some not so, and they were priced at about $30 each.  This is a great example of how inexpensive clothing is today compared to the past.  According to the inflation calculator, the 1957 swimsuit would cost  $83.82 in today’s dollar.

Gripe alert!

I’m seeing something in catalogs and in online shopping sites more and more.  Walmart has a nicely organized chart of item specifications.  Beside the category “Country of Origin” they have specified “Imported.”  Since when did the adjective “imported” become the name of a country?  Personally, if an item is imported, I want to know from where it was imported.  It makes a huge difference to me if the items came from China or Canada, from Italy or Vietnam, or from Britain or Bangladesh.  It is just a sneaky way of not admitting that the majority of what they sell comes from Asia.  And it is not just Walmart either.  I’ve noticed this in catalogs like Brooks Brothers and J. Crew.

3 Comments

Filed under Advertisements

Ad Campaign – Catalina Swimwear, 1946

Yours for carefree California Living…for action, trim sleek suits in ELASTA-Q.   For hours in the sun, spirit-lifting colors that make California live in every Catalina.  

From the time the movie industry landed in California in 1911,  people were paying attention to  the lifestyles of the stars as portrayed in movie magazines and studio publicity shots, and advertisers were quick to try and take advantage.   After WWII, the “California lifestyle” was especially promoted in the ads of every industry from clothing to beer.

In the case of clothing, there was good reason for promoting the casual lifestyle of Southern California, because the industry there was so heavily influenced by it.  So it was no coincidence that most of the makers of clothing in California produced sportswear.

Leave a comment

Filed under Advertisements