Tag Archives: Pollock’s

Updates – The Rest of the Story

It’s time to update a few old stories.  I wrote about the above golf set almost a year ago.  It is from Serbin of Florida, had had a Marianne by Serbin label.

As I’d hoped, I have heard from Marianne Serbin Friedman, and she is in the process of answering some questions about her family’s company.  Stay tuned!

The photo above was sent to me by Pam of Glamoursurf.  Two years ago I posted an ad for fabric that Vera Neumann designed for Schumacher in the 1950s.  In my post I stated that Vera signed a licensing agreement with Schumacher in 1947 and that it lasted for ten years.  Evidently, Vera did a later project with Schumacher, as Pam found an ad for a similar fabric to the one above that was dated 1979.

It always pays to keep an open mind when reading anything about history.  There are no absolutes that I know of.

And finally, I wrote about Lou Pollock’s Asheville shoe store last year.  It was a real treat hearing from his daughter.

I am the youngest daughter of Lou Pollock and you brought tears to my eyes.I was raised in that store and learned when I was very young – how to give to the community. My father not only gave away shoes to children in need on Christmas day – but to care for them 364 days during the rest of the year.  I learned.
Later in years my husband and I were in the children’s wear business in Michigan and the 1st Christmas came along – our thoughts turned to the children and (without details) we carried on the lessons given by my father.  He was also one of the founders of the cemetery in West Asheville in 1916 and made a dream come true to create hallowed ground for our ancestors.  The Cemetery honored him while he was still living – by re-naming it in his honor. The Lou Pollock Memorial Park  where he and the rest of my family are all buried.
 
As for the Haywood Street Pollock’s Store. It was actually called the Cinderella Store and sold ladies’ shoes only.  Whereas the store on Patton Avenue sold Men’s, Ladies’
and Children’s. There were 2 floors. 
 
Did you see the SHADOW of the letters POLLOCK’S on the wall where the letters were removed when remodeled?  They still remain.
 
Thanks for remembering my Father in such a special way, I have many memories still alive on Patton Avenue and Haywood Street. 
That is from Betty Pollock Golden, who is 89 years old.

 

6 Comments

Filed under Rest of the Story

Pollock’s Shoes, Asheville, NC

In my ongoing search for all things concerning hiking clothing, I found this ad in a 1926 issue of Everygirl’s, the Campfire Girls magazine.  I can’t resist looking at the lists of stores whenever they are a part of an ad, and I’m always interested to see if there was a store in Western North Carolina that offered the product.

In 1926 Cantilever Shoes could be bought at Pollock’s Shoes in Asheville.  I had read about Pollock’s in the great booklet, The Family Store, which tells about all the Jewish-owned businesses that could be found in Asheville in the twentieth century.  Pollock’s was owned by Lou Pollack, who according to his obituary, started the business in 1910.  In the 1920s the store was located on Patton Avenue, one of the main streets in downtown Asheville.

There have been a lot of changes on Patton Avenue, including the loss of two entire blocks to parking lots, and much of another to a modern bank building.  Almost incredibly the old Pollock’s store has survived at 39 Patton Avenue, with some distinctive brickwork that can be seen in old photos still in place today.

I was a bit surprised when I looked up one day while walking on nearby Haywood Street, to see the Pollock’s name.

By studying old city directories, which can be found online, I found that for a period of time mainly during the 1940s, there was a second Pollock’s store.  Just by looking at the decoration on the exterior of the building, my guess is that it was a posher version of the old family oriented store.

The Haywood Street Pollock’s was sandwiched between the very nice Bon Marche department store, on the left, and Woolworth’s on the right.  The Bon Marche opened in 1937, and Woolworth’s in 1938, and my guess is that the Pollock’s space dates to the same time period.

Lou Pollock was famous for having a yearly Christmas party for children who needed shoes, and he must have given away thousands of pairs over the years.  Pollock retired from his store in 1939, but the Patton Avenue store was open at least until 1956, the last year I found it listed in the city directory.

I love this kind of urban exploration.  There are little bits of the past still to be found in brick and plaster, tile and signage.  It’s all a matter of keeping one’s eyes open.

15 Comments

Filed under North Carolina, Shoes